Deeds of the Dukes of Chariton, part V

(I sort of forgot about this, honestly.)

Deeds of the Dukes of Chariton


V: The Regency
July 2680 – January 2686

In December 2680 Pamela, the wife of Regent Lavon of Chariton, gave birth to a girl, who was named Theodora. When pressed, Pamela claimed that the girl’s father was Count Zedkiah of Prairie Rapids, but he did not acknowledge the girl as his child.

In February 2681 the seat of the Queen of Lakotah fell to an Iowan army. Queen Lacotawin evaded capture, but Iowan armies were laying siege to her lands.

On May 1 2681, Duke Lyman gave the order for a summer fair to be held at Maryville, and it ended on the last day of June.

In July 2682, the self-proclaimed State of Missouri (also known as the Boonslick Republic) declared war on Duke Carl of Kansas.

After King Franklin had begun his war for Rock Rapids, various lesser rulers took advantage of the Iowan-Lakotah war to try conquering various parts of Lakotah ruled by Queen Lacotawin, including Count Daniel of Freeborn and Chief Stuart of Black Hills.

On August 12, 2682, Queen Lacotawin and King Franklin made peace. Queen Lacotawin ceded Rock Rapids (formerly ruled in her name by Duke Yahto Ingyang of Siouxland) and the surrounding lands to King Franklin.

The next month, King Franklin took Estherville from the heathen priest who had been ruling it and granted it to Gerald, who became Abbot Gerald of Estherville and would later serve as King Franklin’s court chaplain.

In February 2683 there were rumors that King Franklin sought to take Icaria from Countess Diana, Duke Lyman’s betrothed.

King Franklin of Iowa was first called Stonewall in July 2683, after a singer sang of his deeds in the war for Rock Rapids.

In August 2683 Duke Carl of Kansas surrendered to Callway Lohman, self-proclaimed Governor of Missouri, who began to style himself Governor of Missouri and Kansas. As a result of the Boonslick victory, which was soon followed by Count Orion of Bluffwoods swearing fealty to Governor Lohman, the State of Missouri and Kansas extended along the Missouri River from the ancient Nebraska-Kansas border in the north and west through Topeka, Kansas City and St. Joseph to Weaubleau and, in the east, Columbia and Jefferson City near the eastern borders with the Papal States, the Duchy of Waxhaw, and the Duchy of Grand River.

In September 2683, King Franklin Stonewall summoned his vassals for war against the heathen Jarl Ollrod Tarsus of Saint Anthony, a Northman who ruled the lands once known as southwestern Minnesota and northeastern Wisconsin from what was once called the Twin Cities. King Franklin declared that his intent was to return the lands traditionally considered part of the Duchy of Driftless to proper Christian rule.

In early November 2683 1900 Iowans began to lay siege to Rochester, and in December 2683 some 2300 Iowans laid siege to Faribault, near the southern border of the Twin Cities, which was ruled by a vassal of Jarl Ollrod of St. Anthony.

On January 23, 2684 Evanora Wapello, Duke Truman Still’s widow and the mother of Duke Lyman of Chariton and his sisters Fairuza and Evanora, died of poor health at the age of 39 years.

In early 2684, various Norse rulers answered Jarl Ollrod of Saint Anthony’s calls for aid, including Governor Thorstein “the Cruel” Fondulack of the Republic of Superior and the young High Chieftess Bjorg of Minnesota.

In April 2684, Rochester and Faribault fell to Iowan armies. In early May the 1200 Iowans who had taken Cannon began to lay siege to Fort Snelling in the Twin Cities, but 1600 Minnesotans were seen to the north-west and 2800 St. Anthony men were seen to the south-east of the Twin Cities and the Iowan army fled south and west.

On May 27, 2684, Prince Ned of Platte, heir to the Kingdom of Platte, and Duke Truman’s eldest sister Fairuza Still were married at Nebraska City, with King Ned of Platte, Duke Truman of Chariton, Count Hannibal of Hannibal, and Mayor Isaac of Rock Port and the Mayor of Nebraska City all in attendance.

In late June 2684 Duke Lyman befriended Paul, a son of his steward Sheldon, who had also served Duke Truman of Chariton as steward since at least July 2666.

In June 2684 the Iowan and Northmen armies met near Faribault. Baron Pelham of Humboldt led 4400 Iowans and was defeated by some 7500 Northmen. Some 2800 Iowans and 700 Northmen were killed or wounded before the Iowan army fled south toward Rochester.

On August 31 2684 Evanora Still was married to Roquat Adams-Farwell, the eldest son and heir of Duke Poynter of Driftless. Duke Poynter was leading troops in the heathen Jarl Ollrod’s territory, and unable to attend the wedding in Dubuque.

In early November an army of 5000 St. Anthony men began to lay siege to Decorah, ruled by the 16-year-old Count Glen of Decorah and Scott, a younger brother of King Franklin Stonewall and Duke Eustace. Glen had married Petrita, the daughter of Count Hannibal of Hannibal, a few months before.

In March 2685 the self-styled Governor of Missouri and Kansas Callaway Lohman died and was succeeded as Governor of Missouri and Kansas by his steward Micaiah.

In April 2685 Decorah surrendered to the St. Anthony army and Calvin Rodman, the former Duke of the Quad Cities before his surrender to King Franklin, became Mayor of Sioux City at the age of 73 years. Mere days after his accession he began working to reduce the power of the King.

After the fall of Decorah and Waukon, Count Glen’s wife Petrita was taken into captivity by Jarl Ollrod and became one of his concubines. In early June the St. Anthony army began to lay siege to Dubuque.

In July some 500 Iowans led by Abbot Gerald of Estherville were defeated near Winona by an army of 2800 Northmen, and in September 2685 King Franklin made peace with Jarl Ollrod of St. Anthony and Chippewa.

On December 23, 2685 Duke Lyman turned 16 and began to rule in his own right. At a Christmas feast, Duke Lyman was heard discussing his ambition to become King of Missouri with his friends, the sons of his former regent Lavon.

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