Deeds of the Dukes of Chariton, part VII

Deeds of the Dukes of Chariton


VII: Blood
February 2689 – February 2691

Duke Lyman and Duchess Diana’s daughter Pastoria had always been a sickly child, and on Februray 24, 2689 she died after an especially prolonged illness at the age of one year and six months. Duke Lyman’s eldest sister Fairuza resumed her previous place as Duke Lyman’s heir.

The death of Duke Lyman’s daughter reinforced the urgency of securing the succession. An infant daughter would have made a poor enough heir, but due to Duchess Diana’s status as a traitor who made war against the Iowan crown, and the separation that had resulted due to her exile, Duke Truman had decided to seek a divorce from the Pope and purchased indulgences in July and August 2688. Shortly after the death of his daughter Pastoria, Duke Lyman purchased more indulgences in late February and March 2689 before petitioning His Holiness the Pope for a divorce, which was quickly granted in April on grounds of consanguinity. Some scholars of canon law had objected to the match in the first place on the same grounds, as the former Countess of Icaria’s mother Pastoria and Duke Lyman’s mother Fairuza were sisters, making Duke Lyman and the former Duchess Diana first cousins, and therefore too closely related according to some.

In March 2689 some 1600 Northmen from Michigan raided the country near Dubuque, and after his divorce and some searching Duke Lyman arranged to be betrothed to Juniper, the 13-year-old daughter of Duke Napoleon of Little Egypt. Duke Napoleon was also fighting alongside Duke Keifer of Illinois. Duke Lyman and Juniper were betrothed by proxy in May 2689.

In May some 4000 Iowans defeated the Northmen raiding near Dubuque, and in August about 200 Northmen were sighted raiding near Decorah, along the Iowan border with the Northmen of Saint Anthony.

In July 2689, a Indianapolitan army of some 4500 men began to besiege Champaign. The training grounds near Maryville were completed in September, and by Christmas the Illinois army under Duke Keifer’s relative Count Kasimir of Peoria was laying siege to Purdue. In September of that year, the wife of Duke Lyman of Iowa (Duke Lyman of Chariton’s grandfather) had a son, who was named Lyman.

King Ned of Platte died at the age of 72 years on December 7 2689 and was succeeded as King of Platte by his eldest son Ned, whose coronation was held in Omaha on Christmas Day, 2689. By virtue of her husband’s accession to the throne, Duke Lyman’s sister Fairuza became Queen of Platte.

In February 2690, Duke Lyman’s friend Paul was married to Claudette, a natural daughter of the Abbot of Crowley in Arkansas.

Purdue fell to the Illinois army  by early March 2690, and in late May an army of 2200 Badgerlings crossed the Mississippi River from Galena and began raiding near Davenport. The 4000 Iowans encamped near Dubuque marched south and met the heathens in late June, putting them to flight at a cost of about 500 Iowan dead and wounded and about 1000 dead Badgerlings.

After having spent several months bedridden and comatose, Duke Truman’s grandfather Duke Lyman of Iowa died in June 2690 at the age of 68 years. He was succeeded as Duke of Iowa by his infant son Lyman.

By July Champaign had fallen to the Indianapolitan army and the Illinois army under Count Kasimir of Peoria, after taking Purdue, had moved on to besiege Kenapocomoco.

King Franklin of Iowa celebrated Christmas with Duke Keifer of Illinois in Decatur, as King Franklin finally saw fit to cross the Mississippi River and directly join the war against the Atomicists of Indianapolis. In December 2690, the Indianapolitan army had marched to re-take Purdue after accepting the surrender of Champaign, Urbana, and Mahomet and the fall of Kenapocomoco to Count Kasimir’s army.

On January 22 2691, Duke Lyman’s sister Evanora, the wife of Duke Roquat of Driftless, gave birth to a son, who was named Poynter after his father’s father, the first Duke of Driftless. The Duchess Evanora had never been strong, and after giving birth she spent much of her time in bed, trying to recover.

In early February 2691, Duke Lyman began to spend less time at King Franklin’s court in Des Moines and more time in his own lands.

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